What’s going on in this pic? [vts] 2 June 2020 (high school)

Objective: Use visual thinking strategies to describe the meaning of a visual text.  Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the conversation about what you and other students see.

1. look closely at the photo; think about these three questions, and answer them completely:

— What is going on in this picture?

— What do you see that makes you say that?

— What more can you find?

2. After you have written your responses, copy them from the Google Doc attached to assignment #A-06022020-7. DO NOT copy the MLA-8 class header. Then, join the conversation by pasting your response in the comments box (WITHOUT the header).

3. Be sure to add your pkcsd email, and to give yourself an identity that includes your name or your initials.

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the P[E]ACE conversation.

How I make a really good seafood gumbo:

ingredients:
1 cup flour
1 cup peanut oil
2 cups finely chopped onions
2 cups finely chopped bell peppers
2 cups finely chopped celery
1 cup chopped scallions (optional)
1 cup finely sliced okra
2 cloves garlic
Parsley for garnish

6 andouille or smoked sausages
1 lb. chicken thighs, drumsticks (or whole chicken)
2 lb. shrimp (preferably with heads)
2 cups crab meat and/or six crabs (preferably blue)
12-24 oysters (optional)

2 quarts chicken broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon thyme
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon red pepper
1 tablespoon black pepper

Cooked white, brown, or Basmati rice.
Filé (ground sassafrass)

procedure:
First make a seafood broth from the cleaned seafood. Shell and devein (BOTH veins–on the back and under the belly!) shrimp, reserving shells. Clean crabs, reserve shells. Cover shells in a pot of cold water and simmer to make a stock (you may add a stalk of celery, a carrot, or other items you’d put in a home-made stock.)
Stop everything. Eliminate all distractions. No dogs, no kids, no phone. Now comes the roux. The Roux. It is also called Louisiana napalm.
To make the roux, I heat the peanut oil in a cast-iron 5-quart Dutch oven over medium heat. When, hot, I slowly whisk in the flour, smoothing and stirring until all flour has been added. Then I may or may not turn up the heat, but I keep stirring slowly, as the flour turns, golden, then tan, then milk chocolate, then dark chocolate. Do NOT burn the roux. If you do, throw it out and start all over. Your ingredients are too expensive to put into a bitter batch of something that looks like gumbo but tastes awful.
Be respectful of the roux. When it is a rich chocolate brown, add the chopped or minced garlic, chopped onions, bell peppers and chopped celery. This is called the holy trinity in New Orleans. Stir and mix well with the roux, continuing to stir so that the holy trinity wilts and cooks in the fat and flour mixture.
Thyme, salt, red & black peppers and the tomato paste should be added now. Slowly pour or ladle in the stock and chicken broth, stirring until all the ingredients are well mixed, turn down to a low simmer, and put a lid on the pot. Simmer about 10 minutes, then add the chicken.
Slice thin sausage medallions and quickly and lightly brown in a large skillet. Set aside.
After broth has simmered about 20 minutes, add okra. Simmer 5 minutes. Then add shrimp and simmer 5 minutes. Add fresh crab (NOT canned), and simmer 5 minutes. Add canned crabmeat. Add oysters. Stir everything together and simmer 5 minutes. Taste for seasoning and adjust if needed.
Although gumbo always tastes better the next day, who can resist?
To serve, put ½ cup or LESS of rice into a bowl, and ladle gumbo — Louisiana Love — over the rice. It should be soupy, not like gravy.

Sprinkle a teaspoon or so of filé over the gumbo. Enjoy!

 

“The Migration Series” :: Jacob Lawrence

View this video to learn about Jacob Lawrence, historical and cultural events that influenced his thinking, and what inspired his art.  In the comments section, post your answers to four questions about Lawrence, “The Migration Series,” and African-American migration north.

 

  1. Who was migrating in The Migration Series.  Where were they going?
  2. Why were they leaving the South?
  3. What type of jobs had African Americans traditionally done in the South?
  4. What type of jobs were many migrants hoping to find in the North?

 

What’s going on in this pic? [vts] 27 January 2020

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the moderated conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

In your journal, answer these questions:
1. What is going on in this picture?
2. Why do you say that?
3.  What else do you see?
4. Count your words, fill in your table of contents.
Turn and talk to a neighbor about your perceptions.
Click LEAVE A COMMENT:  Reply to this post by writing your journal entry here, including any comments from other students that may have added to your opinion.

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the P[E]ACE conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

 

Literacy Quiz :: Expository Prewriting Stage :: 13 Jan. 2020

OBJECTIVE: Writing is a multi-process. Our quiz this week will assess how well you have mastered the pre-writing stage, and the art of taking a visual text (image), studying that text, and deciding what is happening or what may be going on in that image.  Further, we are assessing your mastery of how well you support your claim with evidence.
The Common Core standard addressed:  RL.X.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text

Write what you believe is going on in the photo, using what you see as evidence.

PREWRITING step 1 :: Look closely at this image. [Click on image to see larger version.]

In your journal, answer these questions:
1. What is going on in this picture?
2. Why do you say that?
3.  What else do you see?
4. Count your words, fill in your table of contents.

PREWRITING step 2 :: TRANSCRIBE YOUR journal writing to the Comments or Reply section of this bLog.
(Be careful of your grammar, spelling and punctuation.)
Click LEAVE A COMMENT:  Reply to this post by writing your journal entry in the comments section.

what’s going on? why? what else do you see?

[Click on image to see larger version.]

 

What’s going on in this pic? [vts] 13 January 2020

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the moderated conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

In your journal, answer these questions:
1. What is going on in this picture?
2. Why do you say that?
3.  What else do you see?
4. Count your words, fill in your table of contents.
Turn and talk to a neighbor about your perceptions.
Click LEAVE A COMMENT:  Reply to this post by writing your journal entry here, including any comments from other students that may have added to your opinion.

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the P[E]ACE conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

 

What’s going on in this pic? [vts] 6 January 2020

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the moderated conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

In your journal, answer these questions:
1. What is going on in this picture?
2. Why do you say that?
3.  What else do you see?
4. Count your words, fill in your table of contents.
Turn and talk to a neighbor about your perceptions.
Click LEAVE A COMMENT:  Reply to this post by writing your journal entry here, including any comments from other students that may have added to your opinion.

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the P[E]ACE conversation about what you and other students see. [Click on image to see larger version.]

 

What’s going on in this picture? [vts]

In your journal, answer these questions:
1. What is going on in this picture?
2. Why do you say that?
3.  What else do you see?
4. Count your words, fill in your table of contents.
Turn and talk to a neighbor about your perceptions.
Click LEAVE A COMMENT:  Reply to this post by writing your journal entry here, including any comments from other students that may have added to your opinion.

 

Look closely at this image, stripped of its caption, and join the moderated conversation about what you and other students see.